anelectricjellyfish:

#OK NOW LOOK AT HER FACE #THE WAY SHE SMILES #THAT’S THE SMILE OF A WOMAN WHO’S HAPPY BECAUSE HER TALENT HAS FINALLY BEEN RECOGNISED #A WOMAN WHO’S TIRED OF BEING PRAISED ONLY FOR HER PHYSICAL APPEARANCE #THANK YOU JOE #SERIOUSLY #THE WORLD NEEDS MORE MEN LIKE YOU

I   didn’t   want   to   leave   her    a l o n e.

lunalovegouda:

Those people who constantly reblog your stuff but you never really talk:

image

gookygox:

onlylolgifs:

Cat snapping a selfie

YES.

gookygox:

onlylolgifs:

Cat snapping a selfie

YES.

echo + season 2 outfits

molotovriot:

For history buffs — the National Archives in the UK have digitised the diaries of hundreds of soldiers from World War I, and have made them available online.

bevsi:

Less “your sexuality/body/race/gender, etc shouldn’t matter” and more “your sexuality/body/race/gender should always be respected”
Don’t equate refusing to acknowledge differences to respecting them

comicsalliance:

DEADPOOL STICKS A THUMB IN DC’S EYE WITH TROLLISH 3D MOTION VARIANT COVER
By Matt D. Wilson
The Marvel Comics press release that announces the above, 3D motion variant cover for September’s Deadpool #34 doesn’t mention the publisher’s rivals at DC Comics, but it doesn’t have to. For the second time in as many years, DC will be releasing a slew of 3D lenticular covers tying into a September event — this year, it’s a Futures End tie-in; last year, it was Villains Month — so this is clearly Marvel have a laugh at DC’s expense, and it wears the face of the House of Ideas’ most enduringly popular troll.
Reflecting not just the flashback contents but also the aesthetic origins of such dubious cover gimmicks, the logo on the cover is purposely the 1990s Deadpool logo. Additionally, the three D’s are apparently for “dashingly dancing Deadpool,” not actual “3D”, which is just delightfully juvenile. And here’s the kicker: Retailers will get one motion cover for every 52 regular-cover issues they order.
That’s right. Fifty-two.
READ MORE

comicsalliance:

DEADPOOL STICKS A THUMB IN DC’S EYE WITH TROLLISH 3D MOTION VARIANT COVER

By Matt D. Wilson

The Marvel Comics press release that announces the above, 3D motion variant cover for September’s Deadpool #34 doesn’t mention the publisher’s rivals at DC Comics, but it doesn’t have to. For the second time in as many years, DC will be releasing a slew of 3D lenticular covers tying into a September event — this year, it’s a Futures End tie-in; last year, it was Villains Month — so this is clearly Marvel have a laugh at DC’s expense, and it wears the face of the House of Ideas’ most enduringly popular troll.

Reflecting not just the flashback contents but also the aesthetic origins of such dubious cover gimmicks, the logo on the cover is purposely the 1990s Deadpool logo. Additionally, the three D’s are apparently for “dashingly dancing Deadpool,” not actual “3D”, which is just delightfully juvenile. And here’s the kicker: Retailers will get one motion cover for every 52 regular-cover issues they order.

That’s right. Fifty-two.

READ MORE

I love celebrity encounters. The best was in a hotel in London.

I was in the lobby and saw Lucy Liu. She’s, like, this tall. She looked up at me and saw a tag sticking out the back of my sweater. She reached up, tucked it in, and said, ‘Now you’re perfect.’

I would die on a battlefield for Lucy Liu.

Canadian novelist Douglas Coupland on dying for Lucy Liu. (via elementarystan)

The biggest issue with equating the library with a Netflix for books is that it sends a false message that libraries are worth little more than $8 or $12 or $20 a month. That the services offered in libraries are little more than options to which people can subscribe, rather than actual services anyone can utilize at any time.

When the library is made to be seen as a business, rather than the heart of a community or a fundamental service made possible through citizen-approved tax dollars, it makes the library expendable. That expendability then moves down the chain: staff salaries get cut, then staff withers, then more programs and projects that benefit the community — books and movies and CDs and magazines and newspapers and wifi and computer access and database subscriptions and programs for all shapes, colors, and sizes of people — disappear, too. It detracts from the unique aspects that make a library what it is: a place for all, rather than a place for some.

Libraries reach out where Netflix reaches in.